The Ancient Crosses of Cumbria and the Lake District

The 7th Century saw the start of the expansion of the Anglian empire, and at the end of the 7th Century, most of Cumbria was in Anglian hands.
 
Anglian crosses still survive in positions they have occupied for over 1000 years at Addingham, Brigham, Carlisle, Crosby Ravensworth, Dacre, Irton, Waberthwaite, Kendal, Kirkby Stephen, and Heversham. Late Anglian crosses can be seen at Burton-in-Kendal, Beckermet, St Bees, Bromfield, Workington, Plumbland, and Dearham. The earliest and finest example is at Bewcastle.
 
Scandinavian settlers started to colonise Scotland (of which Cumberland was part) from the second half of the 9th Century.
 
Norse crosses may be seen at Muncaster, Brigham, Dearham, Aspatria, Gilcrux, Bromfield, Rockcliffe, Penrith and Kirkby Stephen, with the finest example being at Gosforth.

Anglian Crosses in Churchyards and Churches

Addingham

Bewcastle

Crosby Ravensworth

Dacre

 

Irton

Waberthwaite

  

Norse Crosses in Churchyards and Churches

Aspatria

Dearham

Gosforth

Great Urswick

 

Muncaster

Penrith

Rockcliffe

 




There are plaster casts of the Irton, Gosforth and Bewcastle crosses, and the
Bridekirk font, in the Plaster Cast Room (46a) in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London
The Bewcastle, Hexham,
Irton and Ruthwell Crosses
The Gosforth Cross

 
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